Francis blesses the fire

1

You appear as if a match

had been struck in the dark.

 

2

The fire stirs and the cave

is bathed in tenuous

 

light some god made

years ago. The prayer

 

invokes what can’t be said,

what I can’t say in flat

 

prose.

 

3

The cave is cut

into the shade

of rock high

above the Umbrian

plain.

 

4

There are 5 men, livid

like rock, over the flame.

 

5

One warms his stiff

hands; mutters his prayer.

 

6

What balls! to be

there, on your bare

 

bones; the meal rustled up from

dry scraps the wind left.

 

7

1 day I too might cave,

chuck it in, take my chances

in the woods, a friend to flowers

and the birds;

 

throw my last crust to the wind

and the birds.

 

7 March, 2016

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6 thoughts on “Francis blesses the fire”

  1. I turned off the comment notifications of the new posts because we dumped the plugin that was running it, Jetpack! It was breaking several things on the site Jetpack was a free WordPress plugin that incorporates wordpress.com more bloat ware than anything. We’ve since adopted and paid for an Ultimate Member licence which I’m still ironing out but will re-establish those notifications in the coming days.

  2. Love the word play – ‘livid’ such as great word. SF, and saints and prophets generally burn with a righteous anger, a fire so are indeed livid. And ‘1 day I too might cave’..brilliant. Am so in that head-space right now.

  3. thanks Peter. made me laugh. No, have not. have read a non-fiction book on him tho. i wrote this as a class exercise for uni. i have a postcard with 2 works of art side by side on Francis. one of them is called F… blesses the fire, and it’s some art piece in glass, lots of red in it – the (italian) artist’s name escapes me (the card’s in my garage). it’s from 1926. So, oil painting – close!

  4. Lovely reflection on San Francesco, Marco, a favourite saint (well, I don’t recall any others in fact). Don’t know if you have read ‘God’s Pauper’, the translation of Nikos Kazantzakis’s novel on Francesco (he was also an avid Dante fan). Love the last two lines, (that crust to the wind), the seated men around the fire (livid like rock), like an old oil painting!

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