In Passing

What became of whats-her-name
the one who hung around last fall?
Or was it spring, I can’t recall?

Seemed quite sad and melancholic.
We thought she might be alcoholic.
Remember her?

She was with us at your brothers ‘do’
And we talked of how our nails grew?
Well, WE talked, she listened.
Or seemed to.

Then she cried, her mascara ran.
Describe her? I don’t think I can
No, never saw her with a man

Yes! That’s it, you’ve got her now
The one who said you were a cow
to laugh at her that time.

Hey, WOW!

Gassed herself? And her cat?
Why ever do a thing like that?

So ….. who’s now living in her flat?

2017 © Lesly Frances Finn

5 thoughts on “In Passing”

  1. Thanks Lesly – it’s actually very assuring to consider that my poetry mojo will come back 🙂 Thank you! I agree these two expressions, poetry and painting, are closely linked; though it’s hard to verbalize how. At best I can say that the process of each transports me to the same “place”… Lovely to have met you here.

  2. Although I was considered ‘good at Art’ at school I did not get a chance to paint seriously until I was 56. I have lost my mojo for painting at the moment and spend all my spare time on poetry. I started writing in October 2016 when I turned 72. So you see I am at the other end of the life spectrum to you … I am telling you this so that you will understand that it is never too late to follow your interests and you can always hop back and forth between your poetry and your painting. I hope to be inspired to do more art given time. And I do think the two are sort of linked in some people x

  3. Hello Lesly – I’ve been reading your poems 🙂 Have you been writing long? It seems you have a natural rhythm. I like this! I hope you keep posting. As I said in my reply to your comment on my poem, I saw one of your artworks on Facebook and it’s gorgeous. You’re an “artist” in the broad sense. I love the way words can look on a page. In fact, I will often overlook poems that don’t look good to me at a first glance. I guess I’m scared off by dense crowds of words and certain lineups – which is actually very unfair to writers, and I must miss out on a lot of good work. Might be the painter in me sizing up the visual aspect of poetry! I have begun to love poetry that sounds great when read aloud. Sylvia Plath, in her later works, has mastered this in my opinion. Listen, for example, to her reading “Daddy” (can be found on You tube)… It’s very inspiring and moving… not just the content, but the sound. Anyway… gosh, I never usually say this much 🙂

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